Tag Archives: Hierarchy

The Catholic Proposition

Last week, I delivered a presentation to Catholic Adult Fellowship on authority, apostolicity, and the Church, entitled The Catholic Proposition. The written version underlying my remarks is now available here, and a podcast/MP3 version is available here.

Reform and the episcopate

I will admit that I took up Rodger van Allen’s article How to build a better bishop with some trepidation. The agenda of many left-leaning Catholics vis-à-vis reform of the episcopate is no secret, and so I expected nothing good. Nevertheless, there is good and bad in this. Citing (sub rosa) George Weigel’s book The [...]

The democratic fallacy

Periodically, someone will suggest that bishops ought to be elected, and they will place immense weight on the point that bishops were once elected; they are likely to offer a quote (without sourcing) that he who is to govern all should be chosen by all. While it’s true, after a fashion, that bishops were elected [...]

An open letter to Prof. Swidler

Dear Len, I may call you Len, right? (Since you addressed the Holy Father by a familiar diminutive of his birth name in a public letter, I shall consider formality to be ceded ground.) Anyway, your letter has some problems. I’m just going to get out The Red Pen—as a professor, I’m sure you’re familiar [...]

Why “Roman” Catholic?

Some Catholics bridle at the modifier “Roman,” noting that it has derogatory origins, but I think that there’s much to be said for what then-Fr. Joseph Ratzinger had to say about the label fifty years ago: In that it says “Catholic” it is distinguished from a Christianity based on scripture alone, instead acknowledging faith in [...]

Who was the first bishop of the Moon?

Father Z has a post noting that Archbp. William Borders had once staked his claim to have been the first bishop of the moon. The theory works like this: In 1969, Borders was the Bishop of Orlando, and because Apollo 11 had departed from Cape Kennedy, which lay within the Diocese of Orlando, Borders acquired jurisdiction [...]

The hierarchy and the bourbon laity

Max Lindenman has this on the hierarchy and the laity. It strikes me as vital that we hew to a balanced view of holy orders and ecclesiology, steering between the imagined monster of clericalism (truly terrible it would be if it existed) and the very real and corrosive cloud of what we could call “laicism,” a [...]