Monthly Archives: August 2014

Catholics and politics

His excellency Bishop Robert McElroy (Aux. D. San Francisco) reportedly addressed “a diverse group of political players … [gathered] at Georgetown University to discuss the moral implications of partisanship”: McElroy noted that the founders were deeply suspicious of partisanship, or what they called “faction.” They thought parties were necessarily divisive and there is no shortage […]

In re the firearms debate, redux

I last wrote about Catholics and guns in 2013. Kathy Schiffer notes a new book, “My Parents Open-Carry,” and asks for thoughts on gun policy. I should note at the outset that I am uncomfortable with propaganda aimed at children, and this book trips the propaganda alarm for me, even though I favor exposing Americans to guns […]

An ersatz homily for the 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle A

Today’s gospel reading, Matthew, chapter 16, verses 13 et seq., presents the passage that divides the Christians from the Jesusists. Today, as in those days, there was dispute over just who this Jesus fellow might be. In those days, some said that he was John the Baptist, others Elijah, still others Jeremiah or one of […]

Ordinatio sacerdotalis and its limits

This year, many Catholics celebrated or lamented the twentieth anniversary of St. John Paul II’s apostolic letter Ordinatio sacerdotalis, in which the Holy Father settled the question of whether the Church is able to ordain women. Nunc sicut tunc, the spotlight falls onto the question because of moves in the Anglican communion: Now, because of the Church […]

In and out of the cafeteria

Father Dwight Longenecker writes some very sharp commentaries. His most recent is not one of them. It is, alas, pretty stupid. Fr. Longenecker says that “with Pope Francis the cafeteria Catholics are the conservatives,” but the equivalence is entirely false. Let’s start by understanding what we mean by “cafeteria catholic.” That term is an established […]